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Archive for June 2nd, 2009

We had a chuckle when we saw this headline from a movie magazine:

“Terminator Salvation Review”

(click here for the real story)

What comes to your mind?

Here’s what came to ours:

terminator salvation review

Maybe Arnold is on tour with Neil Diamond’s Brother Love’s Traveling Salvation Show? California to Broadway … it would give a whole new meaning to Dancing With The Stars! Now, we’d pay good money to see that revue!

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We cringed when we saw this (painful sounding) magazine headline:

“Steps for Self Branding”

(click here for the real story)

What comes to your mind?

Here’s what came to ours:

self branding

OUCH! Why steps?

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… in Central Texas y’all!

This is a excerpt from the Austin American-Statesman newspaper some 15 years ago. We just came across it again and thought this to be a great blog post topic, especially for some of our friends who are new to the Austin area.

Here are a few of the most common Central Texas pronunciations followed by what some maintain are the correct ways to say them: 

  • Guadalupe: Gwa-da-loop vs. Gwa-da-LU-pay
  • Manchaca: Man-shack vs. Man-CHA-ka
  • Burnet: Burn-it vs. Burr-NETT
  • Manor: May-nor vs. Man-ner
  • Del Valle: Del-vallee vs. Del-VAH-yay
  • Elgin : L-gin (as in “begin”) vs. L-jun an L-jin (as in the liquor)
  • Pedernales: Purr-den-a-less vs. Ped-er-NAH-les
  • Koenig: Kay-neg vs. Co-neg
  • Llano: Lan-no vs. YAH-no
  • Govalle: Go-vallee vs. Go-VAH-yah
  • Coyote: Kahy-oht vs. Kahy-oh-tee
  • Poinsettia: Poin-set-uh vs. Poin-set-ee-uh

Enjoy the Texspeak y’all!!!

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A reader writes:

“I’d love to see ‘effect‘ vs. ‘affect‘.”

We have had additional requests for this topic, so, here goes … Let’s see if this blog post affects an effect on you.

Typically, in everyday writing and conversation, E-ffect is used as a noun, and A-ffect is used as a verb. Of course, there are exceptions, however for our purposes today, let’s stick to this basic premise.

A tip/trick … Effect, with an “E,” means End rEsult or consEquEncE (noun). Whereas, Affect, with an “A,” means to Act or to Assume (verb). 

effect. noun.
1. something that is produced by an agency or cause; result; consequence: Exposure to the sun had the effect of toughening his skin. 
2. power to produce results; efficacy; force; validity; influence: His protest had no effect
3. the state of being effective or operative; operation or execution; accomplishment or fulfillment: to bring a plan into effect. 
4. a mental or emotional impression produced, as by a painting or a speech.
5. meaning or sense; purpose or intention: She disapproved of the proposal and wrote to that effect. 
6. the making of a desired impression: We had the feeling that the big, expensive car was only for effect. 
7. an illusory phenomenon: a three-dimensional effect
8. a real phenomenon (usually named for its discoverer): the Doppler effect. 
9. special effects. NOTE: this day and age, many don’t know that the term “FX” or “F/X” actually stands for “special effects.”

effect. Idioms
11. in effect,
a. for practical purposes; virtually: His silence was in effect a confirmation of the rumor. 
b. essentially; basically.
c. operating or functioning; in force: The plan is now in effect
 
12. take effect
a. to go into operation; begin to function.
b. to produce a result: The prescribed medicine failed to take effect. 
 
affect. verb. (used with object)
1. to act on; produce an effect or change in: Cold weather affected the crops. 
2. to impress the mind or move the feelings of: The music affected him deeply. 
3. (of pain, disease, etc.) to attack or lay hold of.

Source: Dictionary.com (see usage note)

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